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The drought is not over for Southern California.

The U.S. Drought Monitor is reporting that more than 40% of California is out of the drought in the northern part of the state. It’s a different story for Southern California. USA Today reports the area that stretches from Los Angeles to Santa Barbara continues in “exceptional” drought because reservoirs and underground water supplies remain below normal, the newspaper reported.

 

 

 

The Biodiversity Heritage Library welcomes the Arboretum Library

The Biodiversity Heritage Library welcomes The Arboretum Library at the Los Angeles County Arboretum and Botanic Garden as its newest Affiliate. The BHL consortium, which has grown substantially over the past year, now consists of 17 Members and 16 Affiliates.

The Arboretum Library holds an extensive collection of books, magazines, government documents, pamphlets, and audio-visual materials covering a wide range of topics, including gardening and garden design, plant lore, medical botany, botanical art, ethnobotany, California native plant life, and Mediterranean-climate botany.

Giant Sequoia Tunnel Tree toppled by storm

The New York Times reported a giant ancient sequoia with a hollowed-out tunnel that drew thousands of visitors each year in California toppled over on Sunday during heavy rains, according to a nonprofit group.

Attention Artists!

The Arboretum Library is holding an open call to artists who may be interested in exhibiting their work in our new art space. Learn about two art shows planned for 2017 from Librarian Susan Eubank at the open calls on Saturday, January 14 or January 28 from 1 to 4pm.

Catch the rain for your garden: Learn water harvesting techniques

It’s time to think about your winter garden and ways to harvest water on your property should we get more rain.  Crescent Farm uses a variety of water harvesting techniques for its sustainable gardens.  You can learn about them at the Crescent Farm website.

Five years ago Dec. 1…

On December 1, 2011 we awoke to massive destruction from the worst windstorm in recent history to strike the San Gabriel Valley.  We lost 235 trees and more than 700 required corrective pruning.  The Arboretum was closed from December 1 through Christmas day.  This three-week period saw intense cleanup involving as many as 16 public and private entities working in consort to clear the massive quantities of debris.  We opened on the 26th in a very limited way, allowing visitors onto only major roads; many areas were caution-taped off because they were not safe.  Cleanup continued well into 2012.  A positive result of the windstorm was a phenomenally successful exhibit, “Forces of Nature”, that paid homage to the trees lost in the windstorm.

James Henrich, the Arboretum’s Curator of Living Collections, reflected on the remarkable resiliency the plant kingdom demonstrates on a daily basis.  And finally, he said, “revel in the beauty of the Arboretum’s landscape today.”

 

Ongoing preservation of the Queen Anne Cottage

A recent comprehensive assessment of the Queen Anne Cottage was completed by Peyton Hall and his team at Historic Resources Group in Pasadena. Formally known as a Historic Structure Report, the assessment followed national preservation guidelines to provide the Arboretum with a planning tool to guide preservation management and ongoing care.  Click to read the report.

Why care about California’s urban forests? Because…

“It’s become more and more clear that life without trees is a lower quality of life,” tree guru Matt Ritter said in a recent talk to Arboretum members. The professor of biology at Cal State San Luis Obispo explained trees buffer us from climate change, promote wildlife, create safer cities and promote happiness. Details.

Greenhouse gases could extend California’s drought for centuries

Clues from prehistoric droughts and arid periods in California show that today’s increasing greenhouse gas levels could lock the state into drought for centuries, according to a study led by UCLA professor Glen MacDonald.

The Queen Anne Cottage: Planning its Future

A recent comprehensive assessment of the landmark Cottage was completed by Peyton Hall and his team at Historic Resources Group in Pasadena. Formally known as a Historic Structure Report, the assessment followed national preservation guidelines and developed a plan to care for the Cottage. We thank the Dextra Baldwin McGonagle Foundation for its generous support of this study. Dextra Baldwin McGonagle (1901-1967) was the daughter of Anita M. Baldwin and the granddaughter of Elias Jackson “Lucky” Baldwin. Click here to download the report.

 

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